United Way partners with TI & VNA Meals on Wheels to give back on #GivingTuesday

On Tuesday, December 1st, 400 volunteers from Texas Instruments delivered more than 1,100 meals to hungry and home-bound North Texans, highlighting the issue of hunger and encouraging giving and volunteering for the holiday season.

Area nonprofits to raise money on Giving TuesdayThe Dallas Morning News (Source)

United Way teaming up with local groups to Unite for ChangeWFAA Channel 8 (Source)

United Way and Texas Instruments Serve Hungry North Texans #GivingTuesdayPlano Profile (Source)

United Way and Texas Instruments ‘Unite for Change’ on #Giving TuesdayPark Cities BubbleLife (Source)

United Way Delivers 1,000 Meals For Needy On #GivingTuesdayCW 33 (Source)

Giving Tuesday volunteers bring food to Dallas, Collin residents in needThe Dallas Morning News (Source)


Area nonprofits to raise money on Giving Tuesday

By Shabnam Amini, The Dallas Morning News (Source)

Several Dallas nonprofits are joining a national fundraising effort Tuesday.

Using the hashtag #GivingTuesday, the movement promotes a national day of giving at the beginning of the holiday season.

Giving Tuesday was launched in 2012 in partnership with the United Nations Foundation to counter holiday consumerism. Last year, the effort raised more than $26 million nationally.

Participating organizations include the AT&T Performing Arts Center, the North Texas Food Bank, the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas, Dallas Dads Group, Girls Inc., Muslim Legal Fund of America and Irving Cares.

Go to givingtuesday.org.


United Way teaming up with local groups to Unite for Change

via WFAA Channel 8, Can’t see the video above? Click Here

United Way of Metropolitan Dallas President and CEO Jennifer Sampson joined News 8 Daybreak Tuesday to talk about giving in the holiday season and the charity’s Unite for Change campaign.


United Way and Texas Instruments Serve Hungry North Texans #GivingTuesday

United_Way_Texas_Instruments_hungry_North_Texans

By Rebecca Silvestri, Plano Profile (Source)

For hungry and homebound senior and disabled people in North Texas, a hand-delivered, daily hot meal can be critical for necessary nutrition and continued independent, fulfilling lives.

To highlight hunger in Dallas and Collin counties, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas partnered with Texas Instruments (TI) on Tuesday, December 1, encouraging giving and volunteering during this holiday season.

More than 400 TI employees delivered more than 1,000 meals across Dallas and Collin counties. Volunteers gathered at the company’s North Campus site in Dallas and the Spring Creek location in Plano to load up coolers filled with food and begin deliveries. Tuesday’s volunteer effort will help two United Way partner agencies—VNA in Dallas and Meals on Wheels of Collin County—stretch transportation budgets farther, and feed even more North Texans in need.

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As part of the Unite for Change Community Impact series, the project was planned to coincide with #GivingTuesday, an annual social media-based initiative on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. #GivingTuesday is designed to inspire charitable giving during the holiday season. The idea came from “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday.”

“We’re grateful for the opportunity to give back with our time to help change lives for the better and build stronger communities here in North Texas,” said Terri Grosh, TI worldwide employee engagement manager. “TI volunteers are not only investing with their hands and hearts today but also sharing our experiences online to encourage others to join us in giving back.”

Texas has the 7th highest rate of hunger among seniors in the nation. United Way service provider VNA delivers nutritious, freshly prepared meals daily to 4,000 Dallas County residents Monday through Friday. Meals are delivered to the hidden hungry–the homebound unable to access resources like food banks and grocery stores.

United_Way_Texas_Instruments_hungry_North_Texans2

“We’re proud to unite companies and communities in giving back and to support an annual tradition of generosity,” said Jennifer Sampson, President and CEO, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas. “United Way mobilizes volunteers to work together on the causes they care about. Through powerful partnerships, we’re lifting up our neighbors and creating meaningful and lasting community change.”

With TI as the presenting sponsor, the Unite for Change Community Impact Series consists of six volunteer events area wide focused on improving financial stability, education and health across North Texas. Unite for Change, announced in October, was created to engage many local corporate partners in meaningful volunteer projects over a six-month period. The projects will help reach United Way’s 10-year community goals: preparing at least 60 percent of all kids to graduate ready to succeed, moving 250,000 people out of poverty permanently, and improving health across the region.


United Way and Texas Instruments ‘Unite for Change’ on #Giving Tuesday

By Betsy Dixon, Park Cities BubbleLife (Source)

For hungry and homebound senior and disabled people in North Texas, a hand-delivered, daily hot meal can be critical for necessary nutrition and continued independent, fulfilling lives. To highlight hunger in Dallas and Collin counties, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas partnered with Texas Instruments (TI), encouraging giving and volunteering during this holiday season.

More than 500 TI employees delivered more than 1,000 meals across Dallas and Collin counties. Volunteers gathered at the company’s North Campus site in Dallas and the Spring Creek location in Plano to load up coolers filled with food and begin deliveries. Tuesday’s volunteer effort will help two United Way partner agencies – VNA in Dallas and Meals on Wheels of Collin County – stretch transportation budgets farther and feed even more North Texans in need.

As part of the Unite for Change Community Impact series, the project was planned to coincide with #GivingTuesday, an annual social media-based initiative on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. “#GivingTuesday is designed to inspire charitable giving during the holiday season. The idea came from “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday” to establish a fully connected day to kick off the season of giving.

“We’re grateful for the opportunity to give back with our time to help change lives for the better and build stronger communities here in North Texas,” said Terri Grosh, TI worldwide employee engagement manager. “TI volunteers are not only investing with their hands and hearts today but also sharing our experiences online to encourage others to join us in giving back.”

Texas has the 7th highest rate of hunger among seniors in the nation. United Way service provider VNA delivers nutritious, freshly prepared meals daily to 4,000 Dallas County residents Monday through Friday. Meals are delivered to the hidden hungry – the homebound unable to access resources like food banks and grocery stores.

“We’re proud to unite companies and communities in giving back and to support an annual tradition of generosity,” said Jennifer Sampson, President and CEO, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas. “United Way mobilizes volunteers to work together on the causes they care about. Through powerful partnerships, we’re lifting up our neighbors and creating meaningful and lasting community change.”

With TI as the presenting sponsor, the Unite for Change Community Impact Series consists of six volunteer events area wide focused on improving financial stability, education and health across North Texas. Unite for Change, announced in October, was created to engage many local corporate partners in meaningful volunteer projects over a six-month period. The projects will help reach United Way’s 10-year community goals: preparing at least 60 percent of all kids to graduate ready to succeed, moving 250,000 people out of poverty permanently, and improving health across the region.


United Way Delivers 1,000 Meals For Needy On #GivingTuesday

by Shardae Neal, CW 33 (Source)

Just because it’s the season of giving, that doesn’t mean you’ll always be the one on the receiving end. Well, how about turning things around by celebrating #GivingTuesday?

What started out as a social media hashtag has connected with the people at  the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas.   That organization teamed up with Texas Instruments to deliver 1,000 meals to the “hidden hungry.”

“We have about 500 volunteers to deliver meals to the homebound citizens across North Texas,” Terri Grosh with Texas Instruments said.

Texas currently has the seventh highest rate of hunger among senior citizens in the nation! So the ones who aren’t able to make it to the grocery store or a local food bank were thankful for their special delivery.


Giving Tuesday volunteers bring food to Dallas, Collin residents in need

Lisa Williams, a Texas Instruments employee, loads Meals on Wheels food into the back of a vehicle as part of Giving Tuesday at Texas Instruments headquarters in Dallas on Dec. 1, 2015. Texas Instruments partnered with United Way to deliver the meals. (Rose Baca/The Dallas Morning News)
By Matt Peterson, The Dallas Morning News (Source)

For years, Meals on Wheels has been delivering food to John and Amy Sue Lavender.

John Lavender, 57, suffers from multiple sclerosis, and his wife has severe gastroenteritis, along with a host of other maladies, so there’s not much cooking at their Garland home.

“We can put together breakfast sometimes,” the said. “But these come in handy for dinner.”

On Tuesday the Lavenders and other needy Dallas and Collin county residents got some new visitors, thanks to over 400 volunteers from Texas Instruments who took part in Giving Tuesday. It was the third year TI has participated in the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas initiative.

“Today is a day to give back to our neighbors and community,” said Jennifer Sampson, CEO of the nonprofit that organizes the annual initiative to give back after the big shopping weekend.

John Lavender stepped out to greet the volunteers and receive the food that would feed him and his wife for the day. His wife stayed in bed.

“She is a good lady,” he said. “But she doesn’t feel good most of the time.”

John Lavender says he has only five diseases but has lost count on how many illnesses his wife is trying to recover from.

“That’s the bad thing about medication,” he said. “They have to give you one and then it creates a problem and they give you another.”

While John Lavender shared memories of his childhood, Sampson said the “social nutrition” such visits provide Meals on Wheels recipients is every bit as important as the nutritious food.

“For most … getting these meals are the only other human contact they will have all day,” she said.