How to Stay Healthy During the Coronavirus Pandemic | United Way of Metropolitan Dallas

How to Stay Healthy During the Coronavirus Pandemic

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HOW TO STAY HEALTHY DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

For many, the Coronavirus pandemic has turned our lives upside down in one way or other. As we navigate these new, and often stressful, times it’s important to make both mental and physical health a priority. From practicing self-care and staying active to connecting with your social networks and asking for help, we’ve put together a list of mental and physical health tips and resources for adults and children to stay healthy during this crisis.

MENTAL HEALTH

Feeling stress, anxiety or depression is a common in times of volatility or uncertainty—and the Coronavirus pandemic certainly qualifies as such a time. While this public health crisis brings about lots of new and unknown experiences for everyone, remember that we are all facing this together.

 

Support and Crisis Hotlines
Several organizations have created dedicated mental health support lines to assist Texans experiencing stress, anxiety, or emotional challenges during this time:

  • Call the Texas Health and Human Services Statewide COVID-19 Mental Health Support Line 24 hours a day, 7 days a week toll-free at 833-986-1919.
  • Connect with LifePath Systems via phone or telehealth for professional help. Contact 844-544-5939 to schedule a service. Crisis line is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week

 

Self-Care
The World Health Organization recommends these tips for self-care and maintaining good mental wellbeing:

  • Only seek information from trusted sources—minimize watching or reading anything that makes you anxious
  • Stay connected to family and maintain your social networks, while always maintaining physical distance
  • Create a sense of structure and routine in daily life, including regular sleep and rest
  • Pay attention to your body—take breaks, get outside, eat and drink when your body signals it needs it
  • Share positivity—amplify hopeful stories of local people and celebrate successes at work
  • Protect yourself and be supportive of others
  • Be mindful of “unhelpful coping strategies” like smoking and drinking—try to keep them to a minimum.

From sleep and nutrition to meditation and kindness, here are 20 top self-care tips for being stuck at home.

Maintaining work/life balance can be particularly challenging when you’re at home all day. Here are 10 ways to practice self-care while working from home.

 

Resources for Parents
Kids are likely experiencing many of the same the same fears and anxieties as adults. Prioritize giving children the love and attention needed to resolve their fears, explain the situation as honestly as you can, and model healthy responses to stress and anxiety (like self-care).

The Child Mind Institute has helpful information on talking to your kids about Coronavirus and addressing any fears they may have.

This article from the National Association of School Psychologists is a great resource for difficult conversations as well—and includes additional tips on managing fears and anxiety.

Girl Scouts’ Raising Awesome Girls site provides information on how to help girls handle this difficult situation, providing articles and suggestions for parents to talk to their daughters.

Hope & Help is a community site that offers parenting resources and parenting tip videos.

Here are a few great ideas for self-care, managing stress, staying calm and connecting with your kids.

For additional parenting tips and resources to help you navigate this challenging time, check out our Parenting During Coronavirus post.

 

Child Abuse Prevention
Between concerns about employment and wages, the uncertainty of health issues and having kids home all day, the stress on everyone, particularly parents, has quickly escalated. So too has the risk of child abuse and neglect. Abuse hotlines are an important lifeline for our community—for anxious parents in need of help or advice, for frightened children or for concerned friends or neighbors.

Childhelp offers a resource for both parents and children. They are available to help during this public health crisis and welcome any phone calls to their National Child Abuse Hotline at 800-422-4453.

If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, please contact the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (TDFPS) toll free at 1-800-252-5400, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You may also file a report using the secure TDFPS Abuse Hotline website.

 

Supporting Others
These tips from Mental Health First Aid can help you support those around you who might be feeling overwhelmed, stressed, depressed or anxious:

  1. Assess for risk of suicide or harm. Identify if they’re experiencing a crisis such as a panic attack or suicidal thoughts, and address that first. It’s OK to do the assessment over the phone, text or social media. If the person’s life is in immediate danger, call 911.
  2. Listen nonjudgmentally. If the person isn’t in a crisis, ask how they’re feeling and how long they’ve been feeling that way. Pay attention and show you care.
  3. Give reassurance and information. Your support can have a huge impact on the person. Reassure them that it is appropriate to experience fear, sadness or anxiety during situations like this. Remind them that help is available, and you’ll be there for them along the way.
  4. Encourage appropriate professional help. Offer to help them find a professional for support, such as a primary care physician, mental health professional, psychiatrist or certified peer specialist. Behavioral health care providers can provide services by phone and/or secure videoconferencing, so they will be able to maintain physical distancing.
  5. Encourage self-help and other support strategies. Self-help strategies and reaching out for support from family, friends, faith communities and others who have experienced depression or anxiety (peer supporters) can make a difference.

PHYSICAL HEALTH

For Coronavirus prevention tips, symptoms, testing information, and what to do if you’re sick, look to official sources like The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC’s comprehensive guide to caring for children, also includes helpful tips on how to protect kids from getting sick and how to keep them healthy, mentally and physically.

Concerned about COVID-19? Virtual Visit by Children’s Health℠ Virtual Care is offering free 24/7 screenings until further notice with code: COVID19.
 

Staying Active
Staying home is key to stopping the spread of COVID-19, but it has undoubtedly interrupted many of our routines—particularly physical fitness. While it may be easy to sink into new habits of inactivity, there is a strong health rationale to continue (or start!) doing physical activity in your home (or your yard) to stay healthy and maintain immune system function. The easiest way to stay active is to build it into your daily routine. Your body and your mind will thank you. Even 5 minutes or aerobic exercise can help reduce anxiety.

This 1-minute listen from NPR has great tips from experts for exercising at home while you’re staying at home.

Try a fitness class from home. Studios like Orange Theory, Barry’s, Barre3, and Peloton are now offering free at-home workouts to try from the safety of your own living room.

If yoga or stretching are more your speed, try a class from Alo Yoga or tune in to Yoga with Adrien on YouTube.

Wall Street Journal put together dozens of home workouts to do during the coronavirus outbreak, broken down by category for the overachiever, aging athlete, homebound yogi, or outdoor enthusiast—plus workouts for small spaces.

Here are 30 tips from the American Heart Association to help you and your family be more active. And here are a few more tips on how to move more, anytime, anywhere.

These safety tips from athletic trainers are great for working out while staying home.

 

Fitness Activities for Children
Healthy bodies lead to healthy brains—and healthy futures. That’s why United Way created the Healthy Zone Schools program, which provides nearly 200 schools with the tools and resources to increase physical and nutritional education. While schools are closed due Coronavirus, here a few ideas to help keep your kids active:

Check out The Cooper Institute’s list of free resources for physical education and physical activity for students, parents and teachers.

Get your kids moving with GoNoodle. It’s great for guided movement, mindfulness and more.

Sign up for PBS KIDS’ new weekday newsletter and get activity ideas for kids play and learn at home.

Try Cosmic Kids Yoga or Yoga for Kids! on YouTube.

Learn a new dance with Kidz Bop dance-along videos or Just Dance—or make up your own!

 

Eating Healthy
The American Heart Association has lots of great heart-healthy recipes that use shelf-stable ingredients like canned vegetables, dried beans, whole grains, and frozen chicken breast.

Stress eating is a common response to periods of distress. Here are some great tips to eat healthy—and avoid overeating—when sheltering in place.

Mindless snacking can be another challenge while you’re home all day. Here are a few more ideas on how to avoid eating all day while coronavirus keeps us working from home.

Cómo mantener la salud física y mental durante el coronavirus

La pandemia del Coronavirus ha cambiado la vida de muchos de nosotros. Lo más importante es mantenernos sanos física y mentalmente. Hicimos una lista de consejos y recursos para que mientras estamos en casa nos mantengamos sanos durante esta crisis. Aquí encuentras, desde cómo practicar el cuidado personal y mantenerte activo, hasta cómo conectarte a las redes sociales para pedir ayuda.

SALUD MENTAL

El sentirse estresado, ansioso o deprimido es muy común en tiempos de incertidumbre, y la pandemia del Coronavirus es uno de ellos. Estas crisis de salud pública nos traen muchas experiencias que eran desconocidas para todos, pero nos recuerda que estamos en esto juntos.

 

Líneas de Apoyo y Crisis
Varias organizaciones han creado líneas de apoyo dedicadas a la salud mental, para ayudar a los texanos que tienen estrés, ansiedad o alguna crisis emocional en esta época:

  • La línea de apoyo para la salud mental de North Texas Behavioral Health Authority (NTBHA) está disponible las 24 horas del día, los 7 días de la semana, llamando al 833-251-7544
  • Llama gratis a la línea de apoyo para la salud mental de Texas Health and Human Services Statewide COVID-19, disponible las 24 horas del día, los 7 días de la semana, en el 833-986-1919.
  • Conéctate por teléfono con LifePath Systems para recibir ayuda profesional. Llama al 844-544-5939 y programa un servicio. La línea para manejo de crisis está disponible las 24 horas del día, los 7 días de la semana.

 

Cuidado Personal
La Organización Mundial de la Salud da estos consejos para el cuidado personal y el bienestar mental. World Health Organization recommends these tips for self-care:

  • Sólo busca información de fuentes confiables. Evita ver o leer lo que te ponga nervioso.
  • Mantente conectado con la familia y tus redes sociales, pero manteniendo siempre la distancia física.
  • Crea estructuras y rutinas para tu vida diaria, incluyendo descansar y dormir regularmente.
  • Pon atención a tu cuerpo. Haz pausas, ve afuera, aliméntate e hidrátate cuando tu cuerpo te lo pida.
  • Comparte el positivismo. Comparte historias de esperanza, y celebra los éxitos en el trabajo.
  • Protégete y apoya a los demás.
  • Tienes que estar consciente que fumar y tomar no te ayuda. Trata de hacerlo lo menos posible.

Aquí tienes 20 consejos para el cuidado personal cuando pasas tiempo en casa: 20 top self-care tips for being stuck at home. Desde sueño y nutrición, hasta meditación y actitud.

Mantener el equilibrio entre trabajo y vida puede ser muy difícil cuando estás en casa todo el día.  Aquí hay 10 maneras para que te cuides más: 10 ways to practice self-care while working from home.

 

Recursos Para Padres
Los niños seguramente están sintiendo los mismos miedos y ansiedades que los adultos. La prioridad es dar a los niños el amor y la atención que necesitan para quitarles sus miedos. Explícales la situación lo más honestamente posible, y ponles actividades contra el estrés (como los de cuidado personal).

El Child Mind Institute tiene información muy importante acerca de cómo hablarle del Coronavirus a los niños, y de los miedos que pueden tener en: talking to your kids about Coronavirus.

Este artículo This article from the National Association of School Psychologists también es un gran recurso de ayuda con conversaciones difíciles, e incluye consejos adicionales para manejar miedos y ansiedades.

Las Girl Scouts Raising Awesome Girls site dan información de cómo ayudar a las niñas a manejar esta situación tan difícil, con artículos y sugerencias para los padres, de cómo hablar con sus hijas.

Hope & Help es una comunidad que ofrece recursos parenting resources y videos con consejos para padres parenting tip videos.

Aquí tienes unas cuantas ideas para el cuidado personal, manejo del estrés, mantenerse calmado, y cómo conectar con tus hijos: self-caremanaging stressstaying calm y connecting with your kids.

Aquí puedes recibir consejos y recursos adicionales para padres que te ayudan a sobrellevar estos tiempos: Parenting During Coronavirus post.

 

Prevención del Abuso de Menores
Entre la preocupación de no poder mantener el mismo ingreso, la incertidumbre del tema de la salud, y el tener a los niños en casa todo el día, el nivel de estrés de todos, especialmente los padres, ha aumentado rápidamente. Así como el riesgo del abuso y negligencia hacia los niños, particularmente porque todos estamos refugiados en el mismo lugar, aislados de todo. Las líneas directas para el abuso pueden ser muy importantes para nuestra comunidad. Ya sea para padres ansiosos con necesidad de ayuda o algún consejo, para niños temerosos, o para amigos o vecinos preocupados.

Childhelp es un recurso para padres e hijos. Están preparados para ayudar durante esta crisis de salud pública, recibiendo llamadas en su Línea Nacional de Abuso al Menor al 800-422-4453.

Si sospechas que algún niño ha sido abusado o tratado con negligencia, favor de contactar al Departamento para la Familia y Servicios de Protección de Texas (Department of Family and Protective Services, TDFPS) llamando sin costo al 1-800-252-5400, las 24 horas del día, los 7 días de la semana. También puedes reportarlo usando el sitio web Abuse Hotline website del TDFPS.

 

Apoyando a Otros
Estos consejos para la salud mental Mental Health First Aid te pueden ayudar a apoyar a los que están a tu alrededor, que se sienten abrumados, estresados deprimidos o ansiosos.

  1. Evaluación de riesgos de suicidio o de hacerse algún daño. Identifica si está teniendo un ataque de pánico o pensamientos suicidas, y ocúpate de ello primero. Se puede hacer la evaluación por teléfono, texto o en las redes sociales. Si la vida de la persona está en peligro inmediato, llama al 911.
  2. Escucha sin juzgar. Si la persona no está en crisis, pregunta cómo se siente, y desde cuándo se siente así. Pon atención y demuéstrale que te importa. 
  3. Tranquilízalo e infórmalo. Tu apoyo puede tener un impacto enorme en la persona. Reconfórtala diciéndole que está bien sentir miedo, tristeza o ansiedad, durante situaciones como ésta. Recuérdale que existe ayuda, y que tú vas a estar ahí cuando se necesite.
  4. Promueve la ayuda profesional. Ofrece ayudarle a encontrar apoyo, como médicos familiares, profesionales en salud mental, psiquiatras o algún especialista certificado. Los profesionales en el cuidado del comportamiento dan servicio por teléfono o videoconferencia, para que todos puedan mantener su distancia.
  5. Promueve la autoayuda y otras estrategias de apoyo. Ayudarte a ti mismo, y buscar apoyo en la familia, amigos, comunidades de fe u otros que hayan tenido depresión o ansiedad, pueden hacer la diferencia.

PHYSICAL HEALTH

For Coronavirus prevention tips, symptoms, testing information, and what to do if you’re sick, look to official sources like The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC’s comprehensive guide to caring for children, also includes helpful tips on how to protect kids from getting sick and how to keep them healthy, mentally and physically.

 

Staying Active
Staying home is key to stopping the spread of COVID-19, but it has undoubtedly interrupted many of our routines—particularly physical fitness. While it may be easy to sink into new habits of inactivity, there is a strong health rationale to continue (or start!) doing physical activity in your home (or your yard) to stay healthy and maintain immune system function. The easiest way to stay active is to build it into your daily routine. Your body and your mind will thank you. Even 5 minutes or aerobic exercise can help reduce anxiety.

This 1-minute listen from NPR has great tips from experts for exercising at home while you’re staying at home.

Try a fitness class from home. Studios like Orange Theory, Barry’s, Barre3, and Peloton are now offering free at-home workouts to try from the safety of your own living room.

If yoga or stretching are more your speed, try a class from Alo Yoga or tune in to Yoga with Adrien on YouTube.

Wall Street Journal put together dozens of home workouts to do during the coronavirus outbreak, broken down by category for the overachiever, aging athlete, homebound yogi, or outdoor enthusiast—plus workouts for small spaces.

Here are 30 tips from the American Heart Association to help you and your family be more active. And here are a few more tips on how to move more, anytime, anywhere.

These safety tips from athletic trainers are great for working out while staying home.

 

Fitness Activities for Children
Healthy bodies lead to healthy brains—and healthy futures. That’s why United Way created the Healthy Zone Schools program, which provides nearly 200 schools with the tools and resources to increase physical and nutritional education. While schools are closed due Coronavirus, here a few ideas to help keep your kids active:

Check out The Cooper Institute’s list of free resources for physical education and physical activity for students, parents and teachers.

Get your kids moving with GoNoodle. It’s great for guided movement, mindfulness and more.

Sign up for PBS KIDS’ new weekday newsletter and get activity ideas for kids play and learn at home.

Try Cosmic Kids Yoga or Yoga for Kids! on YouTube.

Learn a new dance with Kidz Bop dance-along videos or Just Dance—or make up your own!

 

Eating Healthy
The American Heart Association has lots of great heart-healthy recipes that use shelf-stable ingredients like canned vegetables, dried beans, whole grains, and frozen chicken breast.

Stress eating is a common response to periods of distress. Here are some great tips to eat healthy—and avoid overeating—when sheltering in place.

Mindless snacking can be another challenge while you’re home all day. Here are a few more ideas on how to avoid eating all day while coronavirus keeps us working from home.

This article was published on: Apr 1, 2020